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What immunizations/vaccines should kids have?


    Immunizations are an essential part of a child’s healthcare to protect them from vaccine-preventable diseases. The specific immunizations recommended for children may vary by country or region, so it’s important to consult with a healthcare provider to ensure your child receives the appropriate vaccinations according to local guidelines. However, here are some of the basic and commonly recommended immunizations for children in the United States:

    • Hepatitis B (HepB):
      • Typically given at birth, 1-2 months, and 6-18 months of age.
      • Protects against hepatitis B, a virus that can cause liver disease.
    • Rotavirus (RV):
      • Given at 2, 4, and 6 months of age.
      • Prevents severe diarrhea and vomiting caused by the rotavirus.
    • Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTaP):
      • Given at 2, 4, 6, and 15-18 months and 4-6 years.
      • Protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough).
    • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib):
      • Given at 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months of age.
      • Protects against infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, such as meningitis and pneumonia.
    • Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV13):
      • Given at 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months of age.
      • Protects against pneumococcal bacteria, which can cause pneumonia, ear infections, and more.
    • Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV):
      • Given at 2 and 4 months, with booster doses at 6-18 months and 4-6 years.
      • Protects against polio, a highly contagious viral disease.
    • Influenza (Flu):
      • Recommended annually starting at 6 months of age.
      • Protects against seasonal influenza. Annual vaccination is needed due to changing flu strains.
    • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR):
      • Given at 1 year and a second dose at 4-6 years.
      • Protects against measles, mumps, and rubella.
    • Varicella (Chickenpox):
      • Given at 1 year and a second dose at 4-6 years.
      • Protects against chickenpox, a highly contagious viral infection.
    • Hepatitis A (HepA):
      • Given at 1 year and a second dose 6-18 months later.
      • Protects against hepatitis A, a viral infection of the liver.
    • Meningococcal Conjugate (MenACWY):
      • Given at 11-12 years and a booster at age 16.
      • Protects against meningococcal disease, including meningitis.
    • Human Papillomavirus (HPV):
      • Given as a two-dose series starting at age 11-12, with the second dose 6-12 months later.
      • Protects against HPV, which can cause certain cancers.
    • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap):
      • Given at age 11-12 as a booster and recommended every 10 years thereafter.
      • Provides ongoing protection against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis.

    These are the basic immunizations typically recommended for children in the United States. However, additional vaccines may be recommended for certain children based on individual circumstances or health conditions. It’s essential to follow the immunization schedule provided by your healthcare provider to ensure your child receives the necessary vaccines at the appropriate times. Immunizations are a critical part of public health and contribute to the prevention of serious diseases.

    The Pediatric.me content is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice or as a substitute for medical advice of a physician